Articles Tagged ‘theatre’

ARTFUL BLOGGER: “The Financier” — best Odyssey Theatre performance in 28 years

BY PAUL GESSELL

Photo by Glen Hartle

The Financier, performed by Odyssey Theatre at Strathcona Park, from Tuesday to Sunday at 8 p.m., and weekend matinees at 3 p.m. Photo by Glen Hartle

 

The very stylized form of theatre known as commedia dell’arte is an acquired taste. And, heretofore, I had not acquired a taste for costumed, masked actors preening and strutting on stage like it was the 16th century. But if all commedia dell’arte was like the new Odyssey Theatre production of The Financier, I could become an addict.

The Financier is the best thing I have ever seen performed by Odyssey in its 28 years as Ottawa’s prime outdoor theatre troupe. The set and costumes by James Lavoie are dazzling. The perfectly timed physical comedy, including some wacky dance numbers, is hilarious, thanks to “baroque choreographer” Marie-Nathalie Lacoursiere. The madcap storyline is totally ridiculous. (And that’s a compliment, by the way.)

Laurie Steven, the director of the play and the founder of Odyssey, surely deserves much of the credit for this winner. Of course, it helped that Steven had a great cast, notably Alanna Bale, who played the dual roles of chambermaids Marine and Lisette. Bale stole every scene in which she appeared. Her two roles demanded exaggerated gestures and overly dramatic delivery of dialogue and Bale was so polished that she often left her fellow actors in the dust.

The plot is a comedy of manners by Alain-Rene Lesage and first performed, in French, in Paris in 1709. Fans of Moliere’s Tartuffe will undoubtedly love The Financier or, as it was called in French, Turcaret.

At the centre of the story is The Baroness, played by Chandel Gambles. The Baroness is poor, but beautiful — and an outrageous flirt. One minute she is cozying up to the rich, ugly financier, M. Turcaret (Andy Massingham), and the next moment all her attentions are lavished upon the handsome impoverished The Knight (Atilla Clemann).

All players, including the servants, are greedy schemers, trying to determine the easiest way to fleece M. Turcaret. A diamond ring, a love letter, an IOU, and other props are constantly appearing and disappearing and being tossed from one character to another like hot potatoes. And then a long-lost wife appears and the plot takes off like a rocket into outer space.

In the laugh-a-minute second act, The Financier becomes a total farce. The set is demolished. Actors remove their masks and rip off their costumes. They suddenly look very contemporary. The greedy schemers, they seem to say, are still among us.

The Financier continues outdoors at Strathcona Park in Sandy Hill until Aug. 24. Performances takes place Tuesdays through Sundays at 8 p.m. Tickets from $24. Pay-what-you-can on matinee weekends, which start at 3 p.m. Wise members of the audience bring their own lawn chairs or at least a cushion for the hard wooden bleachers. And arm yourself with insect repellent against the mosquitoes.

Visit their site for more info.

 

Photo by Glen Hartle

Photo by Glen Hartle

 

 

WEEKENDER: Five things to do on the weekend of July 24 to 27 (The Almost Free-Edition!)

BY MATT HARRISON

 

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Famed American hip-hop artist, activist, photographer, and director Ernie Paniccioli will be speaking on Saturday, July 26, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Gallery 101 as part of the five-day Asinabka Film and Media Festival

Asinabka Film Fest (almost FREE)
The third annual Asinabka Film and Media Festival, which celebrates local, national, and international Aboriginal filmmakers, kicks off this Wednesday, July 23 with an outdoor screening of two films on Victoria Island: Decolonizing Together, and Rhymes for Young Ghouls — the director of the latter will be in attendance. Each night during the five-day festival, screenings (and parties) will take place in various locations throughout the city. Thursday, July 24’s screenings take place at Gallery 101, accompanied by food and music (cash bar); Friday, July 25’s films will be shown at SAW Gallery. At 10:30 p.m., there’ll be live music, with a spotlight on Nogojiwanong (Peterborough) musicians: Sean Conway, Tara Williamson, and
 Sarah DeCarlo ($10 cover). On Saturday, July 26 there’s an artist’s talk with director, and well-known hip-hop photographer, Ernie Paniccioli, at Gallery 101 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., with more screenings that evening at the Museum of Nature, starting at 7 p.m. and ending at 1 a.m. ($10 cover). Sunday, July 27 brings the festival to a close with another outdoor screening at Victoria Island at 8:45 p.m. For a more detailed look at the festival, click here.

Wrestling with C.S. Lewis’ Demon
Although C.S. Lewis is more commonly associated with ‘children’s’ series, the Narnia Chronicles, the bulk of his writings concern Christianity (Narnia is, in fact, an allegory for various Christian themes). In his collection, one book in particular stands out: The Screwtape Letters, which involves a professor named Screwtape who is actually a demon from hell who councils a pupil called Wormwood on how to undermine faith and promote sin. It is, essentially, a satirical exposition on how to avoid temptation and sin. It also makes delicious subject matter for a theatre company with a mandate to address works that explore faith and spirituality. No surprise then that the Ottawa-based 9Th Hour Threatre Company is putting on The Screwtape Letters this summer. The play will be performed in the studio at the Great Canadian Theatre Company from Thursday, July 24 until Saturday, August 9. Most weekday showtimes are at 8 p.m.; weekend shows vary. See schedule. Tickets from $20.
The GCTC is at 1233 Wellington St.

Centretown Movies (almost FREE)
Since the days of drive-in movies, there’s been something magical — and very summery — associated with watching a movie outdoors. Centretown Movies has been showing flicks outside in the summertime for decades now, becoming sort of a seasonal rite. The venue has changed over the years, but that fun hasn’t — especially with a schedule that includes new and classic, sappy and campy. Already one week in, this Friday, July 25 Centretown Movies’ Outdoor Film Festival in Dundonald Park shows Rent, which is hosted by the AIDS Committee of Ottawa. The following night, Saturday, July 26, watch the adorable Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zooey Deschanel fall in and out of love in 500 Days of Summer. Movies begin at 9 p.m. and they’re pay-what-you-can. The festival runs every Friday and Saturday until August 16. Friday’s films tend towards awareness of such social issues as mining, homosexuality, AIDS, etc., while Saturday’s films are more entertainment-driven. For the full schedule check here.
Dondonald Park is at Somerset, between Bay and Lyon.

Photo by Alexis Francoeur-Leblond

Empty Shelves play — for free! — on Friday, July 25 at 8 Locks’ Flat Gastropub. Photo by Alexis Francoeur-Leblond

Empty Shelves (FREE)
My ears are tingling, partly due to the ear infection I garnered over the weekend, but more likely because there’s a new, and definitely buzz-worthy addition to Ottawa’s burgeoning indie scene — Empty Shelves. Though they’ve only released two tracks so far, both portend to their future capabilities. The sound of a ticking clock at the beginning of Where Are You sets a constrained measure, both moody and beautiful, and which finally bursts out as a jangly-pop song; while Day Art Circa moves with restrained intensity that swells to create an Explosions in the Sky moment. As a six-member band, they have the potential to create more elaborate sonic soundscapes — which they do — but they also know when to shut down and linger in quieter moments. Empty Shelves play on Friday, July 25 at 8 Locks’ Flat Gastropub on the Rideau Canal — a perfect setting to enjoy their thoughtfully constructed music.
8 Locks’ Flat is at 191 Colonel By Drive

Quebec Craft Beers (FREE)
Ever wondered what Quebec craft brewers are up to? On Saturday, July 26 come out to the first edition of Marché des Brasseurs to find out. A project of the Brewery Market, which has hosted events since 2011 to promote craft/artisanal beers, the event is being held at the picturesque Hendrick Farm in Old Chelsea. Sample beers from Le Trou du Diable (Shawinigan), Brasserie Dunham (Dunham), the Microbrasserie le Castor (Rigaud), la brasserie Benelux (Montréal) and, closer to home, Les Brasseurs du Temps (Gatineau). All ages are welcome. Beer and food can be purchased at the event, which runs from noon to 6 p.m. There’s even a shuttle bus that leaves from Ottawa (Fairmont and Wellington). Reserve here.
Hendrick Farm is at 3, Chelbrook, Old Chelsea

 

 

FROM THE PRINT EDITION: Diversity — and commitment — drives Ottawa’s theatre scene

By JANET UREN

Laura Hall and Cindy Beaton in Ottawa Little Theatre’s production of Mauritius. Photo by Maria Vartanova

Laura Hall and Cindy Beaton in Ottawa Little Theatre’s production of Mauritius. Photo by Maria Vartanova

Earlier this year, CBC Radio hosted a phone-in program asking listeners to respond to the question: “Is live theatre dead?” Some callers agreed, saying, more or less, “It’s been replaced, and good riddance.” Others insisted that nothing rivals the sheer human power of live performance.

In fact, not only is theatre alive, it is growing. Market research done using Statistics Canada data reports that between 2001 and 2008, total consumer spending on live performance increased by 49%. Canadians spend twice as much on performing arts as on live sports, and — according to a 2010 survey — theatre attracts 12.4 million Canadians annually, compared with only 11.1 million for live popular music. That means that almost half of all Canadians over the age of 15 attend live theatre at least once every year.

Still, the economics of theatre — where production costs typically exceed revenues — are brutal, and the average performance-related annual income of actors hovers around $12,000, as reported in The Toronto Star in 2009. “Many actors and comedians leave the occupation because of high job insecurity,” says Service Canada in a report called “Job Futures.” “Like many other occupations in the arts, multiple employment is common.”

There is a lot of competition in Ottawa. With most of the oxygen being taken up by the National Arts Centre and the Great Canadian Theatre Company, there may actually be more companies producing good work here than there is audience. But John Muggleton, an actor who worked in television in Toronto before returning to Ottawa as director of marketing at the Ottawa Little Theatre, says that the competition is not waged with other theatres. “It’s Future Shop and Best Buy that hurt us, all selling products designed to keep people at home.”

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Ottawa Little Theatre, founded as the Ottawa Drama League in 1913

If theatre has survived, it is an economic miracle, largely because of the commitment of driven artists. As David Whiteley of Plosive Productions says: “Nothing else is so comprehensive, so expressive. Nowhere else do you work so closely, so creatively with others. Nothing else brings together so many of the arts — visual arts, music, story-telling, writing. Theatre is complete.”

The Gladstone Theatre shines as an example of theatrical passion. The venue — on Gladstone Avenue west of Preston — was a tired old commercial space until 1982, when the Great Canadian Theatre Company (GCTC) converted it into a rough-and-ready theatre space. There, the company presented Canadian works for over 25 years. In 2007, it was strong enough, financially and artistically, to move into a new purpose-built home. The old bare-bones garage-cum-theatre on Gladstone was left empty. Enter Steve Martin.

In one of Ottawa’s most gallant theatre adventures, Martin purchased The Gladstone and renovated it into a little jewel of a theatre. He had a vision of a small, classy theatre, managed as a business and producing a year-long list of good plays, well publicized and featuring the city’s best artists. The results were disappointing. Martin now leases The Gladstone to Plosive Productions, which manages it as a rental facility and uses it for its own productions. One of those was a recent production of the Canadian classic Billy Bishop Goes to War, a one-man tour de force with actor Chris Ralph playing 18 roles; the play has been nominated for a Rideau Prize for Outstanding Production and Performance.

John P. Kelly of Gladstone Theatre - Photo by Lois Siegel

Director John P. Kelly of SevenThirty Productions, a company that presents regularly at The Gladstone Theatre – Photo by Lois Siegel

 

One of the regular tenants at The Gladstone is John P. Kelly’s SevenThirty Productions, which mounted November last fall — a play that won Best Professional Production and Best Actor awards for Todd Duckworth from the Capital Critics Circle. Kelly came to Ottawa in 2004, expecting to find work here. Instead, he was forced to found his own company, though the last thing he ever wanted was to produce. The results have been artistically acclaimed, but it is a hard living. What keeps Kelly going? “It’s what I do,” he says. “It’s who I am.”

Companies like Plosive and SevenThirty are keeping The Gladstone alive, and Martin remains convinced that his vision is tenable. He believes, however, that theatre-goers are looking for a “blue jean” experience, something that rivals film for ease of access and affordability. He will test that theory with a new show this summer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet. Ticket prices will be low, and Martin intends to marry theatre with live dance music on weekends to appeal to a younger, music-oriented crowd.

The newcomers may be struggling, but Ottawa veterans have arguably survived by identifying a clear niche, venue, and audience.

 

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Odyssey Theatre ensemble photo by John Forster

Odyssey Theatre, for example, is Ottawa’s pioneer “theatre in the park.” Since 1986, it has been producing its annual flagship play in Strathcona Park, where it specializes in commedia dell’arte (the classic masked street theatre of Italy). Ottawa people like to stay outdoors in summer. The Odyssey has captured their attention and used its seasonal success to build, grow, and diversify. It has taken time.

The GCTC also found its way. It started in 1975 with an identifiable constituency — cultural nationalists who wanted to see Canadian works on the stage. It has worked for over three decades to develop that audience and to build a strong business. It has taken patience.

Avalon Studio - photo by John Muggleton

Avalon Studio – photo by John Muggleton

 

A close and disciplined focus may have worked for established companies, but diversity is the emerging trend. Ottawa’s newest theatre business, for example — the Avalon Studio — has several strings to its bow. Last fall, Muggleton and actor/teacher Chris Ralph discovered a long-abandoned vaudeville theatre on Bank Street that had been repurposed for office space. They have reopened it now as a modestly sized and wonderfully atmospheric old theatre, but the Avalon is also making its living as a recreational drama school and event venue.

Ralph, whose acting career includes a diploma from the National Theatre School and work in Montreal and Toronto, is optimistic about the industry. “Theatre isn’t dead,” he says, “but it is evolving. To survive, we have to be flexible and inventive.”

Plays have to change as well, says Muggleton, and to have smaller casts. “As we work out of smaller venues, we need a different kind of play — two- or three-handers that we can afford to mount. Plays also have to be shorter, faster, and more dynamic.” And those plays have to be strong enough to please audiences trained by the consumer market to expect consummate polish and high-paced delivery. There is no room, ever, to compromise quality.

Quality is not the issue for Third Wall Theatre. The company has been presenting classic plays to Ottawa audiences for the past 13 years. It is a critical favourite, recently nominated for five Rideau Prize awards. It is worth noting that although the critically acclaimed God of Carnage drew the second largest audience of any show in Third Wall’s history, it was not a financial success. Welcome to the world of theatre.

Third Wall Theatre - God of Carnage - 2013 - Mary Ellis, Todd Duckworth, John Koensgen & Kristina Watt

Third Wall Theatre – God of Carnage – 2013 – Mary Ellis, Todd Duckworth, John Koensgen & Kristina Watt

 

Third Wall is remarkable in that it has a resident company, a body of actors on which it draws for all productions. This is an unusual model for a small company, but it has allowed Third Wall to build a winning theatrical team. Not only is the company able to count on some of the city’s best actors, but the model helps actors develop onstage relationships. Third Wall has also invested in the nationally recognized director Ross Manson.

Quality is expensive, and Third Wall has felt the sharp end of the financial stick. It too has diversified to survive, notably with the Empty Space Series, where actors gather in the splendid hall of Glebe St. James United Church to read from short stories, letters, or poetry. The company has also created the Third Wall Academy, a training program for young actors. And it is currently hammering out a new business model, including partnerships to develop new theatre works based on classic works of fiction.

At least Third Wall has found a home. Earlier this year, it staged Harold Pinter’s classic one-act play The Dumb Waiter in the friendly, rough-hewn Avalon Studio. In doing so, it benefited from the affordability of an intimate space, the marketing expertise of Muggleton and Ralph, and access to the emerging Avalon community. Third Wall also experimented with an innovative ticket system for that show, with gradually increasing prices for ticket-buyers. This gave the company access to upfront revenues and helped build buzz around the production.

So is live theatre dead in Ottawa? In this brave new world, where newspapers, books, and cursive writing are all threatened with extinction, will theatre be among the casualties? Let us look for an answer to Mark Twain, who once famously observed, “Rumours of my death have been greatly exaggerated.”

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“Passion Play” originally appeared on Page 27 in the MAY 2014 Issue of Ottawa Magazine.

WEEKENDER: The Edward Curtis Project, the great outdoors, and a girls’ day out — plus 6 more events that offer something for everyone

Todd Duckwork, Quelemia Sparrow, and Kevin Loring perform in The Edward Curtis Project.

THE EDWARD CURTIS PROJECT
More than 80 years after photographer Edward Curtis documented the First Nations, which he called a “vanishing people,” Métis/Dené playwright Marie Clements and photojournalist Rita Leistner embarked on a journey to re-contextualize his findings. The result is a phenomenal multi-disciplinary theatre production contrasting Curtis’ findings and the contemporary landscapes and people encountered by these two women. Directed by Clements, The Great Canadian Theatre Company provides an insightful glimpse into modern First Nations communities throughout North America. From $36. Until Sunday, April 21. See website for show times. Irving Greenberg Theatre Centre, 1233 Wellington St. W., www.gctc.ca.

POTTERY SALE AND EXHIBITION (FREE!)
Fifty Ottawa ceramic artists and potters have been wedging, trimming, glazing, and firing up a storm in preparation for the annual Ottawa Guild of Potters Spring Sale and Juried Exhibition. The Ottawa Guild of Potters celebrates their 40th anniversary this year, and will kick off the weekend with a vernissage at 6 p.m. on Thursday. Come browse the creations of local potters, and find a uniquely hand crafted pot or sculpture to call your own! Thursday, April 11, to Sunday, April 14. See website for exhibition hours. Shenkman Arts Centre, 245 Centrum Blvd., www.shenkmanarts.ca.

THE COTTAGE AND BACKYARD SHOW
There might be a snowstorm in the forecast, but that won’t stop us from picturing days spent at the lake or dinners on the patio. The Cottage and Backyard Show rolls into town to get your outdoor space equipped for some fun in the sun. Join in seminars on gardening, grilling, and landscaping with resident experts to brush up on your knowledge of the season. And don’t miss out on this weekend of prizes, contests, and exhibitors to renew your holiday haven. $12, $10 online, children 17 and under free. Friday, April 12 to Sunday, April 14. See website for show hours. Ernst and Young Centre, 4899 Uplands Dr., www.caneastshows.ca/Cottage-Home.

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WEEKENDER: The Beatles Experience, a cool art party, and an orchestra outing for families are on the bill this April weekend

Relieve the magic that was the Beatles with Day Tripper: The Beatles Experience on Thursday night.

DAY TRIPPER: THE BEATLES EXPERIENCE
Though it’s been almost 45 years since The Beatles last played together publicly on a London rooftop, you’ll feel as though it was only “Yesterday” as you behold The Beatles Experience. Four accomplished Montreal musicians take the stage as John, Paul, George, and Ringo, reviving the nuances, mannerisms, and musicianship of the band that forever changed the world. From Beatlemania to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band to Abbey Road, this concert will have you twisting and shouting for more. $51. Thursday, April 4, 8 p.m. Salle Odysée, 855 boule. de la Gappe., Gatineau, www.beatlesexperience.com.

EXTRAORDINARY ARCTIC FESTIVAL
As the weather (hopefully) warms up in the city, things are cooling off at the Canadian Museum of Nature. The Extraordinary Arctic Festival kicks off this weekend, featuring films, storytelling, performing arts, games, and activities. Coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Arctic Expedition (a scientific expedition in the Arctic Circle), the Festival’s feature exhibit, Flora of the Canadian Arctic, contrasts flora specimens from 1912 and 2012. Get out and discover the remarkable heritage of Canada’s far north! $12, students and seniors $10, children $8, children three and under free. Thursday, April 4, to Sunday, April 28, Canadian Museum of Nature, 240 McLeod St., www.nature.ca.

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WEEKENDER: Rubber chickens, rockin’ shows, and oh so much more to make this Easter weekend egg-ceed your egg-spectations! (Ha ha)

FALSE ASSUMPTIONS
Mystery! History! Drama! Romance! Ottawa native Lawrence Aronovitch applied his background in science and tremendous talent as a playwright to this must-see play about women’s contributions to science. Highlighting the hardships, heartbreaks, and hard-won achievements of female scientists, The Ottawa Theatre School and Plosive Productions bring science and sisterhood to the stage in the world premiere of False Assumptions. $20. Tuesday, March 26 to Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m. The Gladstone, 910 Gladstone Ave., www.thegladstone.ca.

The coveted Rubber Chicken Award is up for grabs at this year's Ottawa Theatre Challenge.

13th OTTAWA THEATRE CHALLENGE
Want to be entertained? Put all your eggs in one basket and head over to the NAC’s Fourth Stage. Watch as Ottawa’s theatre companies duke it out in the hopes of taking home the coveted grand prize: The Rubber Chicken Award. The catch? Each theatre group must write, rehearse, and produce a brand new piece of theatre from objects of inspiration provided to them by the other competitors — oh, and they only have 48 hours. Some feathers may be ruffled, but everyone leaves feeling good knowing that all proceeds go to the ALS Society of Canada. From $20. Wednesday, March 27, 7:30 p.m. National Arts Centre, 53 Elgin St., www.fools.ca.

EASTER ON THE FARM
Spring is finally here (sort of), and the Agriculture Museum has come to life! As the barns start stirring with newborn creatures, your little animal lover will be psyched to check out these adorable animals. Visit with these fluffy chicks, furry rabbits, and wooly lambs and learn what make them so special on the farm. When you’re done, wash up and try your hand at making Easter breads. $9, students and seniors $7, children (three to 12) $6, children two and under free. Friday, March 29, to Monday, April 1, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Canada Agriculture Museum, 901 Prince of Wales Dr., www.agriculture.technomuses.ca.

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WEEKENDER: Rock of Ages brings back the ’80s, the Travel and Vacation Show gives you wanderlust, and five more fun events to keep you busy this weekend

It's all about rousing numbers that will have you dancing in your seat at Rock of Ages. All Rock of Ages photos © Scott Suchman.

ROCK OF AGES
“Don’t Stop Believin’” in the power of love and ’80s rock and roll. Rock of Ages, the five-time Tony-nominated smash hit, comes to town with Broadway Across Canada. The story is this: a young girl comes to L.A. in search of stardom and gets swept up the in the fast-paced life of the big city, meeting a boy named Drew along the way who’s got his eyes set on fame. Meanwhile, a developer is trying to change the Sunset Strip and tear down the beloved club the Bourbon Room where all the dreamers come to play. And the ultimate bad boy, rock star Stacee Jaxx, has returned for his final concert with the band Arsenal. The show is edgy, sexy, and campy, and features popular songs by Journey, Night Ranger, Styx, White Snake, and so many more. From $38. On until Sunday, March 10. National Arts Centre, 53 Elgin St., www.nac-cna.ca.

VAGINA MONOLOGUES
To raise funds aimed at ending violence against women and girls and in support of the Sexual Assault Support Centre of Ottawa, VDAY Ottawa presents their take on Eve Ensler’s iconic play. Be prepared to hear a range of stories that range from hilarious to heartbreaking. $25. Friday, March 8, and Saturday, March 9, 8 p.m. The Bronson Centre Theatre, 211 Bronson Ave., www.vdayottawa2013.com.

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WEEKENDER: Love songs, pancake meals, a craft beer fest, and the Funatorium are all on the bill this Family Day weekend

METAMORPHOSES
Director Jillian Keiley makes waves with Mary Zimmerman’s take on Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a collection of myths involving transformation.  The play interprets 10 of those myths and sets them in and around a giant swimming pool, exploring the ideas of water, fluidity, and change. The Romans could be a little saucy, so this one’s recommended for audiences ages 16 and up. On until Saturday, February 16. From $22. National Arts Centre, 53 Elgin St., www.nac-cna.ca.

Two families get together to discuss an incident involving their sons in God of Carnage. Photo by Richard Ellis.

GOD OF CARNAGE
Third Wall Theatre Company presents the outrageous tale of two sets of upper class parents who meet to discuss an incident that happened between their two sons. If you’ve seen Roman Polanski’s Carnage, this will sound familiar: his film is an adaptation of Yasmina Reza’s play. $35, seniors $27. On until Sunday, March 3. Irving Greenberg Theatre Centre (Great Canadian Theatre Building), 1233 Wellington St. W., www.thirdwall.com.

BRIGHT NIGHTS: THE 3RD BALTIC-NORDIC FILM FESTIVAL
Back by popular demand, the Canadian Film Institute presents the most recent incarnation of the Bright Nights film festival. Winterlude partners to bring Inuk, the hard-hitting Danish film and coming-of-age story that addresses the issues facing the Greenlandic Inuit, to Canadian audiences. Director Mike Magidson will be in attendance to introduce and discuss his film. See website for full list of films being screened and detailed festival dates. Friday, February 15, 9 p.m. $12, seniors/ students $8. Canadian Film Institute, 2 Daly Ave., www.cfi-icf.ca.

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WEEKENDER: An indie wedding show, a design showcase, a fairytale-themed party, and six more spectacular events

Maria Gabriela Sanches, whose Tin House Courtyard installation involved placing reflective artefacts in a gathering space in Ottawa, will be one of the people showing her work at Design Lines. Photo by Sarah O’Neill.

DESIGN LINES: MASTERS OF DESIGN SHOWCASE (FREE!)
Come meet and mingle with the design stars of tomorrow. Carleton University’s Master of Design Program celebrates and showcases the innovative design work for which its students are known with this exhibit that highlights projects and achievements as well as the career paths students followed after graduation. Friday, February 8, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. MDES Space, 4th Floor Azerieli Pavilion, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Dr., www.id.carleton.ca.

ON THE ROCKS: FAIRY TALES OF NORWAY
Skål! The Royal Norwegian Embassy and the Ottawa Art Gallery celebrate winter with a fairytale themed party for adults, including gløgg (warm mulled wine), aquavit (a traditional flavoured spirit), Norwegian cheeses, smoked salmon, and other hors d’oeuvres. There’ll be music, stories, art, and (weather permitting) an outdoor lounge. $20. Friday, February 8, 7:30 p.m. Ottawa Art Gallery, 2 Daly Ave., www.ottawaartgallery.ca.

OTTAWA FASHION WEEK
Hot fashion trends warm up Winterlude as Fashion Week struts its way to its ninth season. Get ready to be inspired by a great mix of international designers and local favourites, including Jana and Emilia Fashion, Dare by Gwen Madiba, and Copious by Carissa McCaig, who are all returning from past seasons’ to show at OFW. $45, all three days $90. Friday, February 8, to Sunday, February 10, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Ottawa Convention Centre, 55 Colonel By Dr., www.ottawafashionweek.ca.

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WEEKENDER: The NAC Orchestra takes on West Side Story — plus the Home Renos show, “BRRR-lesque,” and more!

A photo of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra performing live alongside West Side Story. The NAC Orchestra will take its turn with this classic film January 17 to 19. Photo © Todd Rosenberg Photography 2011.

WEST SIDE STORY WITH THE NAC ORCHESTRA
Movies with 3D visuals are so yesterday. How about one with 3D sound instead? Jayce Ogren conducts the National Arts Centre Orchestra’s live accompaniment to the original vocals and dialogue of the digitally re-mastered film West Side Story, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the classic musical. Thursday, January 17, to Saturday, January 19. From $22. National Arts Centre, Southam Hall, 53 Elgin St., www.nac-cna.ca.

RESOLUTION 2013: NEW WORKS FROM SAW VIDEO MEMBERS
Calling all film buffs: Ottawa’s homegrown talent in filmmaking will be showcased at the Arts Court Theatre this Friday thanks to SAW Video, a media arts community supporting local artists. The event features 10 short projects from a variety of genres, including documentary, experimental, animation, and comedy. Tickets available at The Manx Pub and SAW Video (613-238-7648). Friday, January 18, 7:30 p.m. $5. Arts Court Theatre (second floor), 2 Daly Ave., www.sawvideo.com.

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