Weekender

THE WEEKENDER: Billy Bishop Goes to War, The Maiden Danced to Death, and four more events to fight the urge to hibernate

SCREENING OF BILLY BISHOP GOES TO WAR
This stageplay-turned-movie shows us the joys and sorrows of WWI flying ace Billy Bishop. Since first hitting the stage in 1978, Billy Bishop Goes to War has become known as one of Canada’s most widely produced plays. This updated version reflects history and emotion through the eyes of an older Billy Bishop, played by Canadian actor Eric Peterson. Nov. 25, 7 p.m. Nov. 26, 1:30 p.m and 7 p.m. $8, seniors and students $7, members $6. Canadian War Museum, 1 Vimy Pl.  Full schedule at www.warmuseum.ca. Tickets available at box office or by phone: 819-776-8600.

THE MAIDEN DANCED TO DEATH
Film lovers won’t want to miss an award-winning movie featuring scenes filmed right here in Ottawa. In addition to the Glebe, this drama was filmed in Montreal, Slovenia, and Hungary, making it a true international collaboration. The story tells of two brothers in a Communist country, divided by politics but brought together by a shared passion for dance. Selected for the 2011 Montreal Film Festival, the movie was produced by Ottawa’s own Michael Dobbin, who will be at the screening. Nov. 26. 7 p.m. Library and Archives, 395 Wellington Rd. $12, members $8, five film passport for CFI members $35. For more information see www.cfi-icf.ca

“POWER UP!” POWER YOGA WORKSHOP WITH TARA FAIRHEAD
Stretch it out with a power yoga workshop that’s sure to leave your glutes aching. Don’t expect it to be easy; power yoga emphasizes strength and flexibility, and will have you breaking a sweat pretty quickly. This three-hour workshop with Tara Fairhead, yoga teacher at PranaShanti, will challenge you and improve your form — but it will all be worth it when you walk out with the tools to allow for a deeper yoga experience. Nov. 27, 1 p.m – 4 p.m. Pranashanti Yoga Centre, 52 Armstrong St. $40. www.pranashanti.com

DRUM MAKING WORKSHOP
Learn how to build a frame drum and beater with author, teacher, and executive director of the Living Education Institute, David Aubrey Berger. And don’t worry about experience — beginners welcome! Receive step-by-step instruction on building a drum out of deer hide and pine, add a personal touch with some paint, then join in the drum circle as Berger offers lessons on how to play rhythms. Nov. 26, 12:30 p.m – 6 p.m. Tree Frog Percussion studio, 1061 Merivale Rd. 125, plus materials ($25-$40). To register or find more info, call 416-708-1279.

ELECTRIC FIELDS FESTIVAL
Art by the pool and a dance party at the Museum of Civilization: the Electric Fields Festival has arrived. Artengine is known for cultivating new and interesting approaches to electronic art, and it’s all on display during this annual event. This year’s festival looks at relationships between sound and spaces in various places in the Capital. Check out Friday’s Swim Sound at Champagne Bath (321 King Edward Ave.), featuring composer Jesse Stewart, architect Adrian Blackwell, and new media artist Rob Cruickshank. On Saturday, hit up the Museum of Civilization’s Grand Hall (100 rue Laurier, Gatineau, QC) for the Electric Pow Wow, an electro dance party with A Tribe Called Red that’s sure to keep you grooving. Swim Sound, Nov. 25, 9:30 p.m. $10. Electric Pow Wow, Nov. 26, 9:30 p.m. tickets $10 at the door. For full event details, see www.artengine.ca.

MO BROS “SPORTIN’ THE ‘STACHE” PHOTO OP
Calling all of you growing your ‘stache for a cause: Ottawa Movember group Mo Bros is hoping to get as many of you on Parliament Hill for a photo-op! Spread the word to get the biggest crowd possible. The group photo will be sold for donations. Individual photos also available on site for a small donation to Prostate Cancer Canada. Meet at the Centennial Flame. Nov. 27, 3:30 p.m – 5 p.m. For more information check out the Facebook page.


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