#TBT: Eight Years Later, Lindsay Ferguson Returns to the Black Sheep

This article was originally published in the April/May 2007 issue of Ottawa Magazine.

Lindsay Ferguson appeared in our Pick 3 department in 2007

Lindsay Ferguson appeared in our Pick 3 department in 2007

A couple of weeks ago, singer Lindsay Ferguson sent us an email with the subject line “Good Morning From Switzerland!” We don’t get too much spam from the Alps, so I opened it.

In it, Ferguson gave us the update on her career — she now splits her time between Bern, Switzerland and Wakefield — and let us know she would be releasing her new record at The Black Sheep Inn on May 23rd.

She took us on a trip down memory lane by sending us a clipping of the feature we ran in advance of her 2007 release party — also at the Black Sheep.
Check out Ferguson’s new sound on Saturday, May 23rd at The Black Sheep Inn.
8:30
$12 in advance, $15 at the door
Herewith, Lindsay Ferguson’s 2007 Pick Three feature, in which she dreams up her fantasy concerts, dates, and favourite power ballads.
Photo by Christina Riley

Photo by Christina Riley

3 Favourite Possessions

  • My guitar
  • My fingers
  • My life

Read the rest of this story »

WEEKENDER: Five things to do on the weekend of May 21 to 24

BY MATT HARRISON

demontigny.Counting Down The Days.22x15inches.graphite, ink, pencil, and oil on canvas.2015_1000$

One of the pieces of artwork up for bid at Le pARTy Auction at the Ottawa Art Gallery on Thursday, May 21: Counting Down The Days, by Brendan de Montigny (22 x 15 Inches, Graphite, Ink, Pencil, and Oil on Rag Paper, 2015, $1000 framed). Photo: Courtesy of the OAG

Art Lovers
Shhhhh! It’s a silent affair. Well, the art auction part is. The rest of the evening is most definitely a pARTy. On Thursday, May 21, the Ottawa Art Gallery’s annual, and “signature” fundraising event, Le pARTy Art Auction, will host a silent auction for 65 original artworks by regional artists, including works by such artists as Duncan de Kergommeaux, Brendan de Montigny, and Andrew and Deborah O’Malley. The event includes catering by Salt Dining & Lounge, Kichessippi Beer, and Coyote’s Run Estate Winery, among others. Tickets are $85 or $150 for the ‘Art Lovers’ package (allows you to bid early and hang w/ artists.
The Ottawa Art Gallery is at 2 Daly Ave.

Science… for Adults FREE!
Know how to degrease a blue whale? (Do they need degreasing?!?). Betcha don’t. Neither do I. But that’s the kind of very useful information you’ll glean during the Canadian Museum of Nature’s “Science by Night” this Thursday, May 21. The museum is staying open late in order to host a dinosaur game show; present on rare species in the Ottawa River; give a behind-the-scenes tour of the museum’s historic mammal dioramas; and identify minerals (yes, you can bring that weirdo rock you found) … and more. This is targeted for adults, so tuck the kids in bed and head on down to the Museum — but leave someone to watch over them for goodness sakes! Happens from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. More info, visit here.
Canadian Museum of Nature is a 240 McLeod St.

Great Galloping Ghosts!
— It’s the Great Glebe Garage Sale, this Saturday, May 23. Possibly some great finds. Lots of haggling (or, at least there should be — that IS the point of garage sales, ahem). Start early. N’uff said.
The Glebe

up to low 2

A scene from Up to Low, a play adapted from a book by Brian T. Doyle, being presented at Arts Court Theatre from May 23 to June 6. Left to right, back row: Megan Carty, Doreen Taylor-Claxton, Paul Rainville, Kristina Watt. Front row: Chris Ralph, Attila Clemann. Photo: Sarah Hoy

This is a Low
Adapted from the novel, Up To Low, written by acclaimed Ottawa writer, Brian T. Doyle (Mary Ann Alice, Uncle Ronald), director Janet Irwin presents a humorous, coming of age tale set in 1950, where a boy from Lowertown falls in love with a girl whose eyes are “the deep green of the Gatineau Hills” — a love that has him embark on a journey up to Low, Quebec on a Gatineau River adventure. Takes place inside Arts Court Theatre (audience sitting close to the stage in a bar like setting) from Saturday, May 23 to June 6, as part of Magnetic North Theatre Festival. Tickets $20-$35. More info, visit here.
Arts Court Theatre is a 2 Daly Ave.

Arts n’ Crafts FREE!
Minto Park is not just another grassy spot in the city. Past benches, past a bronze bust of Argentinian general José de San Martín (it’s a mystery to me why his bust is in this park — anyone?), there’s a somber and tragic reminder of abused and murdered women. The Women’s Monument is chosen specifically as the spot to yearly host Ravenswing, a volunteer-run, self-sustaining grassroots collective that supports and promotes arts, music, and community in Ottawa. In particular, they yearly host a DIY arts & crafts fair in the spring, with proceeds going towards the Clothesline Project, a public art exhibit run by Ottawa’s Women’s Event Network that speaks out against violence directed towards women and children.

On Sunday, May 24, come on down to Elgin Street’s Minto Park and check out 70 vendors — local artists and artisans — musicians, free-workshops, and arts & crafts all day long from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. More info, visit here.
Minto Park is off Elgin St. between Gilmour and Lewis St.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIMELINE: Long May You Run, History of Canada’s Largest Marathon

BY ROB THOMAS
This article was originally published in the May 2015 print edition of Ottawa Magazine

1975---Start-Line

1975, courtesy of Run Ottawa

In 1975, 159 people laced up their sneakers and set off from the Carleton University campus on a gruelling 42-kilometre jog that eventually becomes the biggest sporting event in the city. It was then — and is now — the largest marathon in Canada. But it won’t hold the title during its entire 40-year history.

Read the rest of this story »

WEEKENDER: Four things to do on the weekend of May 14 to 17

Bamboo Garden-sm

Bamboo Garden, Gwendolyn Best, courtesy of Orange Gallery

Hidden Cats and Other Mysteries (FREE!)
Cats, rats, and ravens — these animals have been labeled as creatures of the darkness at one time or another. Thanks to Facebook, Cats — at one time a witches familiar — are enjoying a unprecedented heights of obsessive popularity; rats and ravens, not so much: the former is still linked to plagues and sewers, the latter to drug-addled poets and murder. The history of mystery that surrounds these creatures is the focus of Gwendolyn Best’s exhibition at Orange Gallery.

Rufus-sm

Rufus, Gwendolyn Best, courtesy of Orange Gallery

Entitled Hidden Cats and Other Mysteries, her works explore the “unexpected”; a subject that “expresses both unease and ease” — much like an Edmund Gorey illustration. The vernissage for the show is on Thursday, May 14 from 6 to 10 p.m. More info, visit here. The exhibition lasts until the end of May.
Orange Gallery is at 290 City Centre Ave.     

Got Glitter?
The act of glitterbombing — literally throwing glitter in someone’s face — is a form of protest. Adopting the same kind of ‘protest’ vibe, GLITTERBOMB is an art performance happening on Friday, May 15 at the Bronson Centre. This 3rd annual GLBTQ celebratory event features music, burlesque, comedy, spoken word, and performance art pieces from Jenn Hayward and others. The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets, $35. More info, visit here.
The Bronson Centre is at 211 Bronson Ave.

Civilization - McBride with phone, Catriona Leger with boot, Brand Long with hand on head

End of Civilization’s (left) Geoff McBride, Catriona Leger, and Brad Long. Photo: courtesy of Same Day Theatre

The End of Civilization
A prostitute, two homicide detectives, and a multiple murder mystery — not a scene from HBO’s True Detective, rather a complex, captivating, comedic play from the master of this genre, George F. Walker. The End of Civilization premieres in Ottawa at the Gladstone Theatre from Friday, May 15 to the end of the month. An out-of-work dad, a stay-at-home mom risk much to save their suburban home from bankruptcy, including straddling the line between morality and integrity — a narrative that surely draws on the past economic crisis and Canadians’ fears of joblessness and debt. Tickets $34. For showtimes and more info, visit here.
The Gladstone Theatre is at 910 Gladstone Ave.

Bike Fest (FREE!)
With a frost warning this past week, it may be premature to move your house plants outside. What isn’t premature? Getting your bicycle ready for the season. Given recent weather it’s likely already being used. But is it ready? If in doubt, take it on Sunday, May 17 to Mountain Equipment Co-op on Richmond Rd. (Westboro), which is hosting Bikefest 2015 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. There’s a group-ride, seminars on cycling maintenance, commuting, wellness, etc., and more — even a chance to buy or sell bike gear. More info, visit here.
MEC is at 366 Richmond Rd

WEEKENDER: Four things to do on Mother’s Day Weekend

PD-Left-to-Right-Shara-Weaver,-Jessie-Huggett,-Sylvain-Bouchard,-Amelia-Griffin,-Bella-Bowes,-Liz-Winkelaar,-Rob-Chartier_photo-by-Rachel-Gray

Flesh & Spokes dancers — part of NAC’s Ontario Scene. Photo: Rachel Gray

Lessons from Screw Ups (FREE)
Instead of a diary, Erin Blaskie’s dad gave her a Commodore 64 when she was six-years-old. Her mistake: When the Internet became widely available, she began sharing — and over-sharing — her thoughts on Open Diary.

Software designer, Rob Villeneuve teamed up with some friends to create programs for motorsports. His mistake: Fueled by a lethal cocktail of caffeine, ignorance and ambition the startup crashed and burned after only two years.

These are just a few of the presenters at the fourth edition of F*ckUp Nights — a bimonthly event hosted at Maker Space North where people talk about their biggest professional or business failures in a candid and irreverent way. Meant not only to show that we learn from our mistakes, but also to “shake off” the stigma of failing — I mean, we’re all going to fail at some point. To think otherwise is unrealistic.

F*ckUp vol. IV takes place on Thursday, May 7 at Maker Space North, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. More info, visit here.

Maker Space North is at 250 City Centre, Bay 216

Flesh & Spokes
“The first composition ever created for and on a wheelchair” — as such, Flesh & Spokes is a dance performance unlike anything seen. Fusing flesh and metal, the performers from the Propeller Dance Company. Perhaps a ‘truer’ expression of the world in which we live, the performance demonstrates that “disability is merely a different life experience, rather than a limitation or lack of ability … if you can breathe, you can dance.” The show is part of the NAC’s Ontario Scene and takes place in conjunction with the GCTC. It takes place on Friday, May 8 and Saturday, May 9 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. More info, visit here.
The GCTC is at 1233 Wellington Street West

6120392Keep that (Literary) High Going
With Ottawa’s International Writers Festival’s spring edition having just wrapped up, literary junkies are likely on the backside of the high, coming down from basking in the glow of literati. And yes, like the literary pusher that Writer’s Fest is, it offers just enough events this month to feed your addiction. If, however, you’re looking to soar back up to great heights, the Wakefield Writer’s Fest is in full swing this weekend, hosting events in the Hills’ village from Friday, May 8 to Sunday, May 10.

The events are scattered at locals throughout the village, so make sure and check the program. Highlights include the traditional author’s brunch on Saturday, May 9 at the Wakefield Mill Inn & Spa, which includes readings by local francophone writer Madeleine Lefebvre, author of critically acclaimed L’Effet tornade; Alan Cumyn, twice-recipient of the Ottawa Book Award; and Charles de Lint, “renowned trailblazer” of the modern fantasy genre. On the same day, join a workshop with the aforementioned Lefebvre and de Lint, as well as Frances Itani, MaryAnn Harris, and Laurie Fyffe.

More info on events, tickets, and directions, visit here.

Wakefield, Quebec (there’s no sign for the village — thanks Province of Quebec — so look for exit “La Peche — Route Principale”)

sandwiches-623388_640Royal High Tea
“Oh crap! It’s Mother’s Day.” That’s what I said to myself a few days before the actual day upon realizing I had, once again, forgot to mail my poor mother a card. (Sorry ma). On Sunday, May 10, if you’re mom’s in town have her don her best fascinator and head over to Commissioner’s Park (near Dow’s Lake) for Mother’s Day Royal High Tea (that’s select fine teas, little, crustless sandwiches, and sweets). She’ll love it. This is part of Tulip Fest, which is on from May 8 to the 18. High Tea happens from 11 am to 2 p.m. at Liberation Café. $20 adv. It includes live entertainment.

Commissioner’s Park is near the intersection of Preston and Carling.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: What the heck is Pedal Punk?

Last week, our friends at Centrepointe Theatre approached us about featuring Pedal Punk. It’s BMX bikes, acrobats, and steampunk style, they said. We said, we love those things, but all mixed together? What the heck?

Indeed, they conceded, Cirque Mechanics, the group behind the show, hasn’t been to Ottawa before, so it needs a bit of education.

 

Pedal Punk image courtesy Centrepointe Theatre

Pedal Punk image courtesy Centrepointe Theatre

Herewith, 10 reasons Cirque Mechanics will blow your mind!

  1. There are approximately 90 wheels on stage in Pedal Punk.
  2. The aerial Penny Farthing in Pedal Punk can also be used to ride on the ground. It is a real bike!
  3. Many of the bicycles in Pedal Punk were built from parts found in scrap yards. A great way to 
recycle and repurpose parts!
  4. The Gantry Bike featured in Pedal Punk as the Bike Shop is an original Cirque Mechanics 
apparatus, weighs 3,000 lbs. with artists on board, yet it can be pedaled by just 2 people.
  5. The Gantry Bike steers like a bulldozer or a tank.
  6. It takes a team of 4 people 1 1/2 hours to build the Gantry Bike. It also takes 1 1/2 hours to pack 
up the whole show.
  7. The Gantry Bike has a top speed of 5 mph and can be pedaled indoors and outdoors.
  8. The cast of Pedal Punk is made up of 10 artists: dancers, trampolinists, aerialists, a BMX rider, a 
juggler and clown, a rhythmic gymnast, a contortionist and a stilt‐walking stuntman.
  9. It took one year to create Pedal Punk.
  10. The entire show fits in one 26’ truck.

Saturday, May 2, 2015 at 7:30PM, Cirque Mechanics presents Pedal Punk at Centrepointe Theatres.
Tickets are $49.75 and are available on centrepointetheatres.com or through the box office at 613‐580‐2700.

Pedal Punk image courtesy Centrepointe Theatre

Pedal Punk image courtesy Centrepointe Theatre

 

 

ARTFUL BLOGGER: Skinned animals, stuffed birds, and Alex Colville

By PAUL GESSELL

Skinned animals at Museum of Nature

Photo courtesy Museum of Nature

Photo courtesy Museum of Nature

The skinned camel with its head neatly sliced in three is awesome. Ditto the skinless, almost featherless ostrich and the tall giraffe, its birthday suit removed to reveal all its inner workings.

But the star attraction of these anatomy lessons might prove to be human — just an arm, actually, with the skin peeled back to reveal muscles and tendons and slender bones. The fingernails remain intact. Somehow the nails, more than anything, tell us this preserved arm once was attached to a living, breathing body.

Visitors to the exhibition, Body Worlds: Animals Inside Out, at the Canadian Museum of Nature tend to gravitate to that human arm. You are allowed to touch it and shake its bony hand. Nearby, a real human heart rests, its pumping days long gone. You can hold it and speculate on whose life it once powered.

Read the rest of this story »

WEEKENDER: Four things to do on the First Weekend of May

BY MATT HARRISON

summer-solstice-midsummer-maypole

Image, courtesy of www.imgkid.com

Once considered the first day of Spring, May 1 was celebrated in more ancient times with young people dancing around phallic-shaped maypoles (also thought to symbolize the world axis or, in Norse cultures, as the universe itself). In the 19th C., it was adopted by the workers of the world as International Worker’s Day — which it still is today. For some countries (Russia, I’m looking at you), May 1 also became a day to parade all manner of assorted weapons of mass destruction, because nothing says birth and renewal like an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile armed with a five-megaton nuclear warhead.

This May 1st weekend, celebrate the birth of spring (so to speak) by attending a variety of non-lethal, less phallic events.


rdmSoAj5JAwqsARiXivxNi8NBa-McMLoOO1QbhMz3QTMxF3ZdPAsW-mXARjE5FXUCcWLy4lwoK17vOtPwC0rARhrnKueiWJfRSeLhIGdQ2BLmowjgliNgnn2UnnVI8lRLu1jFIVvcdHvqjlfBBoeKtd-ef0P_jGPry47jV9dORrjVJgVWm9ZYJH1yTh-GGpXoqo2WWJ5nFpncAjdRB85r1E

Moonfruits at Cafe Nostalgica this Thursday, April 30. Photo credit: J.B. Hildebrand

Happy Birthday Café Nostalgica
Bust our your platinum (cuz we all have oodles of platinum lying around?!?) Café Nostalgica is celebrating its 20th anniversary this Thursday, April 30. That house-y looking coffee spot at the University of Ottawa is throwing a Quebec-themed b-day bash, which includes loads of music — Chloe Perrault, Moonfruits, The Howards, Mackenzie, Rhythm Section, and Capital DJ — and such provincial-themed food as cheeses, mini tortiere, poutine, pea soup, plus cotton candy, popcorn, and more. Show up before 8 p.m. and get a free drink. Decorate a mug even. $15. Starts at 6 p.m. More info, visit here.
Café Nostalgica is at 601 Cumberland St.

lovepetri-476x480

Biotechnology is a Technology of Love… By Jennifer Willet, Digital Photograph, 2013 Photographer: Arturo Herrera

Still Life is Dividing, Multiplying (FREE!)
Breathing pore; protocell; hylozoic; hibernaculum — word-y words you’d expect to hear coming from the mouths of, say, scientists at the National Research Centre (or not, given the gov’t’s present gag-orders). But from visual artists?

Yet, the fusion of science and art is the protoplasm from which a new field is emerging: “Bioart features a diverse range of practices from the lab, the wilderness, and cities, which use cells, microbes, plants, and bodies (human and otherwise) in the production of art” — this according to the catalogue excerpt from the travelling exhibition, BioART: Collaborating With Life, which debuts on Thursday, April 30 at the Karsh-Masson Gallery. Curated by Jennifer Willet, it features works by her, and seven other artists, including a performance piece by Alana Bartol. The Thursday vernissage is from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The show is up until May 31. More info here.
Karsh-Masson Gallery is at 110 Laurier Ave.

Cold-Specks-video-608x465
Cold Specks (and gang) Steal the (Ontario) Scene
Ontario Scene kicks off this weekend — Friday, May 1 — with Cold Specks, a Toronto-based songstress and Juno/Polaris Prize nominee whose music has been called ‘doom soul’.

In spite of what that may conjure, be assured that Cold Speck’s music is deft, beautifully haunting, and her performances are mesmerizing. She’s playing with Etiquette — that’s Graham Walsh of Holy F*ck and Julie Fader, also a visual artist — along with Ottawa’s Boyhood. The former just released their debut in March (a must-hear if you’re fans of Air, The Chromatics); the latter produces experimental, drugged-out sounding pop (think The Brian Jonestown Massacre/Raveonettes). Show’s at 9 p.m.; tickets $15.
Ritual is at 137 Besserer St.

Main Street Market on McLeod
Where are the fiddleheads? The asparagus? Typically some of the first offerings from the soil, they appear to be absent from local shops — not surprising given the long winter, which has fresh veg lagging by a few weeks. And yet, the late start to the season won’t deter the Main Street Farmer’s Market from opening this Saturday, May 2 — except, that it isn’t being held on Main Street near St. Paul’s University. During the on-going construction on that road, it’ll be held, instead, at the Canadian Museum of Nature on McLeod for the next two years — every Saturday from May 1 until end of October, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The Canadian Museum of Nature is at 240 McLeod St.

 

 

 

ANNOUNCING! The winners of the Ottawa Magazine Short Fiction Contest

Earlier this year, we announced our first-ever short fiction contest. We knew there were writers out there, crafting great stories and dreaming of sharing them with a wider audience. We wanted to provide the audience — and tap into some of that creative energy. So we put the word out there and crossed our fingers. We got some great support from the local and national writing community, who shared our post through social media.

Illustration by Alanah Abels

Illustration by Alanah Abels

And the entries poured in! First it was a trickle, then came the flood. Over 75 entries in total were judged through a “blind” process — thanks rob mclennan for that suggestion, which helped us read each story with an open mind. Three members of the Ottawa St. Joseph Communications team read every story, and a fourth helped us whittle the long list down to a winner and a runner-up.

And the winner is…

Barbara Sibbald, for Waiting

And the runner-up is Theresa Wallace, for Camping at Mont Tremblant

You can read these two stories in the Summer issue of Ottawa Magazine, which hits newsstands in early June.

 

SOUND SEEKERS: Ontario (Scene), Yours to Discover — Kalle Mattson’s Snapshots

BY FATEEMA SAYANI

Ahead of the NAC’s Ontario Scene extravaganza, we tap into hometown homie Kalle Mattson’s Instagram account to get a snapshot of the province through a musician’s eye. Mattson will play with The Sadies and The Wooden Sky on May 8 at the Bronson Centre, just one of many concerts and events taking over the city in the coming weeks. Find full details online.

Read the rest of this story »