Author Archive

QUEST: Raspberry Rhapsody

BY CINDY DEACHMAN

Originally published in the September 2014 edition.

RaspberryRhapsody

Heirloom Cafe Bistro’s smoked paprika and cumin spiced Berkshire pork tenderloin with grilled peach and raspberry-red onion jam. Photo: Christian Lalonde

Remember picking raspberries out in the countryside as a kid? The fruit, with its velvety feel, fairly burst against the roof of your mouth, didn’t it? Although perfection was right rare. Either a hard unripe berry would not come free of its white cone (the receptacle), or the fruit was dull red and past its peak, or birds had picked the bush clean. Thank goodness raspberries have gone commercial, then. (Not to say they’re not still prone to dampness, mildew, and overripeness.) So sweet when prime — sprinkle with sugar, pour a little cream over. And as Edward A. Bunyard in 1929 understated the matter in The Anatomy of Dessert, “I find the smallest drop of a fine champagne in [this] simple mixture is acceptable to many.” Although, c’mon, raspberries can be awfully fun to dress up even more!

Smoked Paprika and Cumin Spiced Berkshire Pork Tenderloin with Grilled Peach and Raspberry-Red Onion Jam
Imagine cooking turkeys with raspberries in the combat zone! Yet that’s what 17th-century founder of French cuisine Pierre La Varenne suggested in Le cuisinier François in the chapter “Cooking With the Army.” On the other hand, Richard Kletnieks, chef and co-owner of the Heirloom Café Bistro, dreamed up a raspberry-red onion jam to accompany tender, juicy Berkshire pork tenderloin. Spicy sweetness — there’s ginger in the jam — together with the loin and its smoky paprika-cumin rub makes for one great combo. Grilled peaches add a surprise element to this well-thought-out dish. $26.
Heirloom Café Bistro, 7 Mill St., Almonte, 613-256-9653

Mozart Torte
Mozart Torte, an old German recipe, is “a balance of flavours,” says Margret Stubbe of Stubbe Kanata. That concept matches the well-tempered music of Mozart. Thus we have the harmonious notes of almonds, chocolate, and raspberries. Stiffly whipped egg whites give the sponge cake lightness. Then instead of flour, ground almonds make up this gluten-free number, giving not only substance but fine taste. Dark chocolate glaze enrobes the whole of it, while dark chocolate ganache fills the four layers. The raspberry filling in the middle?  Pure brilliance! Eine kleine Nachtmusik, indeed. $35.
Stubbe Kanata, 500 Hazeldean Rd., 613-435-4336

Raspberry Lemonade
Union Local 613 (finally a hip spot that doesn’t take itself too seriously!) produced its own pop from the beginning. Therefore it’s no surprise that they make their own raspberry lemonade from scratch. “It takes a boatload of work!” says co-owner Ivan Gedz. So is it worth all that bother of mixing juiced lemons with made-in-house raspberry syrup and mint syrup? We say yes! Lively, fresh, with a touch of raspberry. For a honey-caramel version, Union 613 adds Wild Turkey bourbon, which is cured in oak casks. The corn makes it sweet. $4; with whiskey $10.
Union Local 613, 315 Somerset St. E., 613-231-1010

FOLK FEST PRIMER: Lorde, M. Ward, Lee Fields, and other make Chris Lackner’s must-see list

For its 20th anniversary, the Ottawa Folk Festival has expanded to five days for the first time (Sept. 10-14), leaving local fans with more musical options than ever before. Pop culture junkie Chris Lackner highlights the acts not to miss at this year’s festival.

 

M. Ward plays Sept. 10.

M. Ward plays Sept. 10.

M. Ward (Sept. 10) – The Wednesday night lineup features some big headliners in pop-rockers Foster the People and Blues Traveler. But low-fi, Americana troubadour, M. Ward, is the one not to miss. The talented producer and musician’s solo work sounds ageless, culling influences from folk, country, and gospel. But it’s Ward’s gravelly voice that truly resonates. Part of She & Him with Zooey Deschanel, Ward deservedly gets the chance to hog the spotlight when flying solo.

Lorde (Sept. 11) – The young electro-pop chanteuse has lorded over the music scene over the last year, practically taking it by storm with her debut Pure Heroine. Lorde breaks the female pop star mould. A darling of both critics and fans, she may be the most buzz-worthy name in this year’s lineup.

Fields

Lee Fields and the Expressions play Sept. 12.

 

Dailey & Vincent (Sept. 11) – They put the blue in Bluegrass. With stunning harmonies and a top-notch backing band, Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent will help many fans discover – or rediscover – the musical genre.

The National (Sept. 12) – The moody, introspective indie-rockers are one of the most talented band’s in the business – proving you can make intelligent rock music and still become a headliner. Matt Berninger’s deep, brooding, baritone vocals are pure magic.

Lee Fields and the Expressions (Sept. 12) – You got soul? The venerable North Carolina artist has been crafting R&B since 1969. The man is timeless.

Neutral Milk Hotel (Sept. 13) – The revered, experimental indie band have a cult-like following despite disbanding after their acclaimed 1998 album In The Aeroplane Over the Seas. In 2013, frontman Jeff Mangum and company announced a reunion tour with their entire 1998 lineup. Dreams do come true. This Milk will go down easy for lovers of bands like Arcade Fire and The Decemberists.

Couer de pirate plays

Coeur de pirate plays Sept. 14

The Strumbellas (Sept. 13) – The Canadian six-piece’s 2013 album, We Still Move on Dance Floors, was one of the year’s best. The indie-rockers fuse folk, country, and bluegrass to craft a stirring live show. Prepare for an assault of hollers, handclaps and harmonies.

The Lone Bellow (Sept. 14) – The Brooklyn country rockers play acoustic-based Americana as it was meant to be – with grit, earthiness and fire in the belly. Fans of The Lumineers and Mumford & Sons will find something to like. Fans of Johnny Cash and Hank Williams will too. (Fans of today’s plastic pop country stars need not apply).

Coeur de Pirate (Sept. 14) – Yes, the final day is chalk-full of headliners such as The Gaslight Anthem and Joss Stone, but one not to miss is spellbinding Quebec songstress Béatrice Martin – otherwise known as Couer de Pirate. The petite singer-songwriter has an unexpectedly powerful voice that could simultaneously break hearts and move mountains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Burden of Genes: Meet a Family Living With a Painful Genetic Disease [Sponsored]

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At the time his son was born, Arie Pekar was starting a life on dialysis, which he was then on for three hours, three times a week. Arie was worried he wouldn’t be healthy enough to experience his son growing up.

Arie has a disease called autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) that causes cysts to develop on kidneys and can lead to an increase in total kidney volume (TKV), resulting in very painful, irreversible damage. As cysts on the kidneys develop and the kidneys grow, other organs may become affected.

Growing up with a mom with ADPKD, Arie had a 50 per cent Otsuka-1chance of inheriting the condition. He knew that one of the early symptoms of the condition is hypertension and monitored his blood pressure regularly at home from a young age. When he came home from university one weekend and had high blood pressure, he immediately went to the doctor. Being at risk for the disease, his physician conducted an ultrasound, confirming the diagnosis.

At a faster–than–normal rate, Arie’s kidneys declined and were functioning below 10 per cent. He was immediately put on dialysis and told he would need a transplant in order to feel healthy again. Two years ago, in an effort to find a new kidney, Arie’s wife, Joy, started a Facebook campaign called “Mom and Me Need a Kidney.” Several family, friends and strangers came forward, finding only one suitable match – a long-time friend who agreed to donate his kidney.

In Canada, treatment is available for patients like Arie help to manage the symptoms associated with ADPKD, such as high blood pressure and pain, however there are no approved medications available that slow the progression of the disease. When individuals with ADPKD develop renal failure, the only options available are to undergo dialysis or transplant, which can be costly and invasive. As was the case with Arie, transplant is only possible if a suitable donor is found, which can take years.
 
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“Since I have a parent who has ADPKD, I knew I was at a high risk of getting it too,” says Arie. “My advice to other families – especially those who aren’t familiar with ADPKD – is to educate yourself and know your options. Reach out to other families who are in a similar situation and speak to your doctor.”

ADPKD can run in a family for generations, and some individuals have lost family members who didn’t even know they had the disease, yet died from eventual kidney failure. Once individuals with ADPKD are at risk for kidney failure, they will have to remain on dialysis for the rest of their life until they get a kidney transplant and will often need additional organs transplanted as well.

It’s important that Canadians know their family history, understand their risk of inheriting ADPKD and speak to their doctors for a proper diagnosis. For more information about ADPKD and to connect with others living with the disease, visit www.endPKD.ca.

This is a sponsored post, which means it was paid for by our advertising partners. Learn more about Otsuka Canada Pharmaceutical Inc. at www.otsuka.com/en/.
 

“The “The

KITCHEN CHRONICLES: Celebrating one year of Kitchen Chronicles PLUS some acknowledgements

By Barbara Sibbald

After-mash 

Fiona walks into the kitchen, prepared to tangle with the mess of bottles and debris from last night’s party. Luc wasn’t in bed when she woke up so she assumed he’d gone to buy the paper. But there he is, sitting at the kitchen table, with his usual cappuccino. The kitchen is spotless, the dishwasher hums gently.

—   You cleaned up! she exclaims. And it was such a wreck when we went to bed.

—   Sleepy head, he chides with a grin. I’m not a total slug, you know. Besides you did the lion’s share of party prep.

—   It went well, didn’t it? she says, settling into the chair across from him.

Luc nods.IMG_4300

—   It was great! he says. Loads of people. I don’t think I talked to anyone for more than three minutes. Did you get a chance to talk to Georges or Anne?

—   Anne. I can’t quite face Georges on his own yet, after what he did. But then I keep thinking, if Anne can forgive him, who am I to hold a grudge? I think it’s the way it all went down. Anyway, Anne was gushing about how things were going so well with them, but then later in the evening she was steaming because Georges was flirting with Trish.

—   No way! says Luc.

—   Oh, yes. Trish does look fabulous. The short hair suits her and her breastfeeding cleavage is fabulous! She was flirting with him too.

—   What was she doing? asks Luc.

—   Oh the usual Trish stuff, touching his arm and shoulder, touching her face, flipping her hair. As I was passing, I heard her telling him how good he looks and guessing he’s like fifteen years younger than he actually is. She knows his age! Usual BS. Trish hasn’t lost her touch. Craig didn’t seem to notice at all. Or maybe he doesn’t mind.

—   Just as well if he’s going to stay with her, says Luc.

—   Yeah, well Anne should take a page out of his book. Georges is incorrigible. I think he’s grown up a bit this past year, but some things will never change. He’s a flirt to the core.

—   Still, he should be more considerate of Anne, says Luc. If he has to flirt, he should at least make sure she’s not around.

—   For sure. Anyway, they seemed okay by the end of the evening. Holding hands, laughing.

Luc takes a sip of his coffee.

—   Trish and Craig seem really happy together too, he says.

—   And Sunshine is adorable, adds Fiona.

—   But what a flakey 70s name, says Luc. What were they thinking?

Fiona shrugs.

—   Maybe it will suit her, Luc. Hey, could you please make me a capp too? she asks.

—   Oh, yeah, sure. Sorry.

Luc gets up and begins fussing with the machine. You’d think it was rocket science, thinks Fiona with amusement.

—   Jacen looked well, says Luc.

—   Yeah, you’d never know he has HIV. I didn’t get a chance to talk to him. How’s he liking the geriatric gig?

—   So far so good. The patients — clients, I guess — they love Jay.

—   No surprise! says Fiona. He can be so entertaining. And he’s a good listener.

—   I’m sure the old guys love that, says Luc. We all need to someone to listen to our old stories. That’s what makes us who we are.

—   Did you know Neil phoned last night? says Fiona.

—   Oh did he?

—   Yeah. He was sorry he couldn’t come to the party.

—   And he’s doing well?

scrambled-eggs—   Finger’s crossed. So far, so good. He likes his new job, designing apps. And he’s out of his apartment, working in an office. All guys, but still, he at least has a social life. Plus he loves living in Burnaby. I have to hand it to Dad….

—   Speaking of which, did you talk to Don? I know he’s your gardening buddy, but this as the first time I’ve met his girlfriend. She reminds me so much of Lorelei.

—   Except she’s really nice!

—   Meow! Your Dad’s wife isn’t that bad.

—   Best thing about Lorelei is that she lives far away! I have to admit she’s being good to Neil though. And she did back down on the will.

—   After you stuck your big oar in!

—   Rightly so!

—   Oh believe me, I’m not being critical, says Luc, handing her a cappuccino. I couldn’t be happier about him paying for Gavin’s university.

—   I know, says Fiona. What a great break for us! And Gavin. Hey did you see him cadging a beer last night?

—   I figured he might, says Luc. He is fourteen after all.

—   Oh, I forgot to mention. Don and his girlfriend got engaged.

—   That was quick, says Luc.

Fiona shrugs.

—   Some people just like being married.

—   Would you? asks Luc.

—   What do you mean?

He laughs.

—   Would you like being married?

—   I haven’t thought of it in years, says Fiona.

That’s not entirely true, she thinks, remembering a year ago when they moved in. House and all, I thought it might be time to make it all official.

—   I remember you made a big fuss about it when Gavin was born, continues Luc.

—   Yeah, well, it’s different when you have a baby. I wanted more security, for him as much as for me.

—   And I was such a jerk about it. It would have been easy enough.

—   Luc! I never thought I’d hear you say that.

—   Yeah, well, I’ve grown up a bit. I’ve been thinking about us, about getting married. I’d like to celebrate, to formalize….

—   Why now? she asks. After all these years.

I can’t believe it, she thinks. Then again, everything’s always on his terms. Luc shrugs.

—   Georges and Anne were a real wake-up call for me. I wasn’t sure they were going to make it. And when I was talking to Georges about what it would be like to be single, well, it made me realize how sweet I have it. With you. And then Georges talked about how he doesn’t treat Anne very well, and I wondered whether I treat you well.

—   You do, says Fiona.

—   Well, I thought maybe I could show it by buying you some bling or something, but then I thought about what you’d really like, and I wondered if you’d like to get married.

She smiles at him affectionately. He really is trying, she thinks.

—   You’re so sweet, she says. Let me think about it. I don’t want to mess with something that’s working. Marriage might change the dynamics.

—   What do you mean?

—   I don’t know exactly, says Fiona. It’s just a gut feeling. Maybe we’d stop trying as hard. Like sorting out the control thing we both have going.

—   It’s sorting, says Luc. Well, except you want to be the boss.

—   Ha ha, she says, grinning. You know what I mean, Luc. If we were married, we might not work at the relationship in the same way. We might just settle in. Stagnate.

—   So you don’t want to? he asks.

—   Just give me some time to get my head around it, she says.

—   Another fifteen years?

—   It’s been working so far! Fiona says.

They smile at one another across the kitchen table.

THE END

Acknowledgements

Thank you to my thoughtful readers, Kathlyn Bradshaw, Stuart Kinmond and Jeremiah Bartram, for their excellent suggestions. Thank you to the friends and family members who shared their wonderful recipes with me over the years. They’ve become my favourites. Merci to Joelle and Danielle Dumont, the talented sisters who graciously and quickly corrected all my French language errors. And finally, I thank my beloved husband and cooking partner, Stuart Kinmond, for the illustration, encouragement and endless Chronicle-related conversation. Cheers!

 

 

DAYTRIPPER: Almonte — bustling arts scene, shops, and foodie paradise

BY ERICA EADES

bakerbob

Baker Bob and his ‘helper’. The bakery is just one of many shops to visit in the quaint, historic town of Almonte. Photo by Justin Van Leeuwen

With a thriving local arts scene, a bustling main street, and a new-found identity as a foodie’s paradise, Almonte — the quaint, historic commuter town just 30 minutes west of the city — has hit its stride.

Mill Street Crepe Company  
14 Mill St.
613-461-2737
Executive chef Charlene Santry is the creative mastermind behind Almonte’s little slice of France. Nestled in the new Heritage Court — a collection of independent shops at the bottom of Mill Street — Mill Street Crepe Company, a licensed venue, offers an ever-changing lineup of crepes. Our favourite is the country-style smoked ham and Gruyère, packed with oven-dried tomatoes, thyme, and apple-honey mustard. But you may have to get one of each.

Tin Barn Market
73 Little Bridge St.
613-801-3920
Whatever your thrifting fancy — be it vintage, antique, handmade, or up-cycled — Tin Barn Market is bound to deliver. A relatively new addition to Almonte’s historic town centre, this tiny concept shop features a wonderfully eclectic mix of vintage housewares and salvaged goods, plus handcrafted jewellery and stationery.

Doree’s Habit
65 Mill St.
613-256-8837
A stylish boutique sure to impress even the most discerning fashionistas, Doree’s Habit is one of the area’s best-kept secrets. With a remarkable eye for detail, owner Brodie O’Connor selects clothing and accessories that are at once fun, fresh, and sophisticated. The shop is also committed to keeping things local: Schwiing (Montreal), Pink Martini (Toronto), and Vandentillaart (Kemptville) are just a few Canadian lines you’ll find.

Baker Bob’s
75 Little Bridge St.
613-256-7674
No visit to Almonte would be complete without a stop at Baker Bob’s, a local institution. A bit of a celebrity in these parts, owner Bob Graff has been serving up home-style goodies since 1995. Stop in for freshly baked butter croissants, muffins, and Danishes (the blueberry is to die for). Wash them down with an excellent cup of fair-trade organic coffee, with beans supplied by Almonte’s own Equator Coffee Roasters.

Palms
78 Mill St.
613-256-2676
Impeccable service and authentic ambience distinguish this charming artists’ hangout. Owned by chef/baker Sally Parsons, Palms is not just an average coffee shop. All food is prepared fresh on the site, from the sweet and savoury loaves and scones to the artfully crafted paninis (we recommend the capicola, a delightful little number stuffed with capicola ham, provolone, peppers, onions, and succulent sun-dried tomato pesto).

Gallery: Photos by Justin Van Leeuwen

KITCHEN CHRONICLES: Is Trish in labour? PLUS a seasonal dill pickle recipe

KITCHEN CHRONICLES: Trish learns the bald truth about family PLUS recipe for Gado gado chicken skewers

SHOP TALK: ByWard Market gets a boost with the opening of two hip stores

EVENT PREVIEW: Up close with Mini Maker Faire designers Ecotonos

QUEST: Best bets for milkshakes and other cool sips